Music4Learning #1

Tips for using Music4Learning. Research attachments too.

Do cows produce more milk when they listen to music? Research suggests they do. Do shoppers spend more money when particular types of music are played? Some businesses think they do. Do students learn better when music is playing? There’s a great deal of research to suggest it has a significant impact.

“Music is the most powerful sound there is, often inappropriately deployed. It’s powerful for two reasons: you recognise it fast and you associate it very powerfully.”

Julian Treasure of The Sound Agency http://www.thesoundagency.com/ (quoted from his TED talk on how sound affects us), tells us that productivity can be massively increased by the correct and thoughtful use of music or just the removal of the open plan office idea. He illustrates the power of music. A couple of bars of the theme music from Jaws is instantly recognisable but the second example is the first chord from A Hard Days Night – a Beatles Classic. You need to have a particular date of birth to get it without thinking.

Nina Jackson, a distinguished and well known education consultant, has drawn together her love of music and extensive research in her book ‘The Little Book of Music for The Classroom’ (available here http://www.crownhouse.co.uk/publications/product.php?product=365 ). So you can take a classroom situation and enhance it, flip it, break it and jazz it up in a number of subtle or less discrete ways.

The Wellcome Trust in the UK have also brought together a number of thoughts about the benefits of music on health and wellbeing. It’s not just the Mozart Effect you know. Take some time to find out about the cows and milk production. Professor Adrian North did and he swears by it. I have added some links to studies by scholars and esteemed Professor Susan Hallam of the Institute of Education on how music, behaviour and progress are all linked. It’s the very nature of the subjectivity and the cognitive functions of the brain that we haven’t quite got to grips with but with every new study that uses MRI and CT technology we can get a glimpse of what’s going on up there.

“Do cows produce more milk with Mozart or The Rolling Stones?”

I am constantly on the lookout for new music to use in the classroom. I stumbled across ‘Fanfare for the Common Man’ by Aaron Copland and the London Symphony Orchestra. No pressure but what a great way to introduce a new speaker to a classroom or start a class assembly. And there’s only one volume setting for this track: Loud. Throw in a bit of the Radetzky March Opus 228 by Strauss performed by the Winer Philharmoniker and you’ve got quite a show.

I’ll reveal some great ways to use music in the classroom in some moreMusic4Learning episodes but if you can’t wait then take a look at I Can Teachhttp://www.icanteach.co.uk where there are plenty of ideas. Links to the research I mentioned are below. Feel free to add your ideas in to the comments below and share with some of your colleagues.

Wellcome Trust: The Big Picture – Music and Health http://www.icanteach.co.uk/_resources/Wellcome_Trust_Big_Picture_Music_Mind_and_Medicine.pdf

The effects of background music on health and wellbeing http://www.icanteach.co.uk/open-resource/resource-id=214

Five Studies on the Effects of Music on Behaviour http://www.icanteach.co.uk/open-resource/resource-id=215

Author: Marcus Cherrill

Teacher, scientist, runner.

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