TeachMeet Brighton 2015

TeachMeet Brighton 2015 #TMBTON, admirably hosted by Brighton University on a sunny evening, brought together a great bunch of teachers looking to share ideas. David Rogers (@daviderogers), Peps McCrea (@pepsmcrea) and Leah Sharp (@leah_moo) facilitated and shared ideas too.

Darren Arbon (@Dr_Arbon) presented simple ways to use technology in the classroom. No gimmicks just good learning techniques and lots of fun. Lesley Munro (@LesleyMunro4) took us through the contents of a Revision Goodie Bag for Year 11 students and Rachel Ramaker (@rjramaker) told us about Little Free Libraries and how they work to build communities of readers. Laura Braun (@Braunteaches) gave us a run through of ‘Prove It’ sheets, an excellent and well used assessment for learning tool and John McKee (@jmckee) described his school’s ambition to change the language of behaviour to ‘grit and self-management’ and how to monitor its impact. David Rogers (@daviderogers) described his links between a Year 9 class and a Year 6 class, testing each others knowledge on common themes of study and Ben Rouse (@mr_brouse) showed how a ‘draftback’ review of revision history in Google Docs could be an awesome feedback tool. Leah Sharp (@leah_moo) had a quick-fire set of ideas to use in the classroom, including the use of Twitter and emojis to improve literacy. Helen Pengelly (@hdiamondcoach) brought a sense of calm and purpose with a look at ‘mindfulness’ in schools and there was a quick look at Crumbles too.

My presentation was called ‘Music4Learning Meets Kahoot’, a mash up of two great ideas. I have used Kahoot a great deal in my classroom with real success. Disengaged becomes motivated and purposeful, disinterested becomes collaborative and cheerful and it’s a piece of cake to make it work.

Kahooters will know that look of engagement you get when the pin code arrives on the screen. At TeachMeet Brighton we had 30 teachers ready to answer the questions. The prize, a pair of T-Shirts emblazoned with the words ‘Teacher of #Awesome’ and ‘Kahoot Champion’ and some great stickers with top tips for Kahooting: Top prize! Not to be put off by the slight lag in connection, I described how I used Kahoot in my classroom: revision lesson, fun starter, plenary, afternoon reward slot, tutor activity, student-generated games and plenty more. You can also use Global Kahoots, sharing across several screens or ‘Ghost Mode’. I used each question in this Kahoot to highlight the different types of music that can be used in the classroom. That might be calming music or wake-up and tidy up music or even thought-provoking music to improve creativity and productivity. I Can Teach has provided music for the classroom for over 8 years and has been used around the world in over 160 different countries. My Kahoot is here if you’d like to take a look.

The Kahoot was a success. Great participation, engagement, fun and healthy competition. No swearing, no tears, just a few sad faces on those further down the leaderboard. Using it for CPD and staff training is also a great way to engage people. This was my first TeachMeet. I felt very comfortable showing people how I use such a great tool for the classroom. Any nerves I had quickly disappeared once I pressed the ‘Play’ button.

Kahoot is free and very easy to set up. There are similar ideas in Socrative and Plickers but I prefer Kahoot purely because of the simplicity, reliability and engagement. Sign up here. Do get in touch if you’d like to find out more about using Kahoot or I Can Teach.

Marcus Cherrill (@ICanTeach_Uk and ideas@icanteach.co.uk)

Immerse yourself in Science

“Take high quality science content and put it into a 4D adventure world and you’ve got students hooked.”

Our school have recently signed up for a trial of IntoScience. It takes students on a fantastic journey through a range of challenging and varied realms and scientific concepts. Once logged in the students create their own avatar with brilliant graphics controls and a plethora of options: ecologist, astronomer, chemist or physicist. A neat little backpack for gadgets collected along the way is a must-have accessory. Your super-scientist now enters the Research Lab and starts their quest for Inquiry Points. Game on!

We run a three year Key Stage 4, so we are looking to squeeze content and engagement into two years of Key Stage 3. Our concern was the dip in engagement and interest towards the end of Year 7. They had settled in, discovered the joys of chemistry and Bunsen burners and were heading into statistically the least productive year of their secondary education. So IntoScience fits perfectly into our plans. Year 8 are the pilot group. Year 7 will love it too. We will do a quick impact assessment at the beginning and at the end of the year.

The teacher’s point of view is pretty cool too. There are quizzes and tasks and student responses can be observed, recorded and responded to in real time. Don’t forget some of the top game changers from the Sutton Trust and Prof. John Hattie:feedback, homework and metacognition. Throw in a bit of Digital Technology and your value for money just keeps growing.

There are good links to the revised Key Stage 3 National Curriculum for England and Wales and these will continue to be developed but the content has a predominantly Australian feel about it. IntoScience has hopped its way over from the land down under and is another gem from the creators of Mathletics, Spellodrome and Reading Eggs. 3P Learning are aiming to bring regular updates to the service with new features and interactive activities; the latest one is an electricity activity with students needing to fix a monorail.

We are looking to augment our curriculum, not replace it and this will enable high levels of engagement and extend it beyond the classroom. Our regular practical work will continue. It’s excellent enrichment and we are looking forward to getting to grips with more challenges in the new term.

We will keep you updated with progress!

http://www.intoscience.com/uk/

Music4Learning #5

“Teaching is a passion. Don’t do it if it’s not.”

Wellbeing is underrated. So many people pay little attention to their own or others. Hardworking teachers and students crashing and burning their way through an academic week means there is little left for anyone else come the weekend. Teachers are victims of their own regime. The timetable creates a Pavlovian phenomenon of knowing exactly what you are doing and when. But this hamster wheel is where we lose the ‘why’ of teaching.

Let’s refocus on the ‘why’ then. Teaching is a passion. Don’t do it if it’s not. We nurture, guide and applaud young people. We push and pull, cajole and coax and equip brave young minds with resilience and tenacity. To survive this rollercoaster I need time to look after myself and my students. I need to know when I am pushing them too far. I use the music from I Can Teach to ‘chill out’. Generally, with no lyrics, the music allows me to refocus, to reflect and calm before the next onslaught. Try it before that ‘hard to teach’ class arrives. The effect is not short-lived. My favourite track in Chill Out has to be La Femme d’Argent by Air. You can almost feel the waves lapping around you and a gentle sea breeze keeping you nicely chilled. Follow this up with Homebase by dZihan and Kamien and you are in a different place – a different space. Northern Lights by Lux is delicious in its simplicity. You can melt away in this music.

So, you’ve tried the therapeutic self-awareness route and you are now confidently going to try it on that class of 8 year olds or 13 years olds that have bounced in after break. It works. It creates a calm, peaceful and purposeful atmosphere. It physically changes the chemical balance of hormones in the body. Calm teacher, calm class of learners. Greater focus means improved productivity and greater confidence. ‘Chill Out‘ does not mean ‘Doze Off’. There is an intrinsic purpose to this choice of music. It works.

ASAP Science: The Scientific Power of Music (2:00)

“More of the brain is involved in perception and response to music than to language or anything else.” – Oliver Sacks

Lastly, if you like the academic rigour behind all of this then check out Oliver Sacks – Tales of Music and the Brain. His site is here. Worth a good look.