Want a better world?

Nearly 50 pupils from across Eastbourne and Seaford gathered to discuss and debate ideas on global issues such as clean water, renewable energy and sustainable technologies. They presented their ideas to the conference of pupils and teachers and then shared their ideas with other pupils in true science conference style. Eastbourne College again hosted the second STEM Leaders’ Conference on Thursday 26 April at the prestigious Birley Centre in Eastbourne and it was a great success for all involved.

The schools attending included Seaford Head School, Willingdon Primary School, St John’s Meads CE Primary School, Parkmead CE Primary School, Pevensey and Westham CE Primary School and The Haven VA CE Primary School. Pupils had been working on a variety of projects over the last few weeks inspired by a wide range of resources created by the global STEM charity Practical Action. These projects included The Squashed Tomato Challenge (where pupils find a way to transport tomatoes down a Nepalese mountainside to take them to market without squashing them), The Floating Garden Challenge (where pupils design, build and test different forms of floating garden so that people in Bangladesh can still grow crops even in flood waters) and Ditch The Dirt (where pupils create a water filtration system to clean dirty water).

Conference Organiser, Marcus Cherrill of I Can Teach Ltd, who created the conference on behalf of Pevensey and Westham School said, “The STEM Leaders’ Conference is all about sharing ideas and allowing pupils from local schools to work on engaging and stimulating projects. They can then develop their leadership, teamwork and presentation skills through the Conference. It is a very supportive and non-competitive environment which allows pupils to really develop their confidence. We also had support from a number of local and national companies who provided prizes for the pupils, their teachers and their schools.”

St John’s Meads CE Primary School won a VIP Tour of local pharmaceutical company TEVA, where they dress up in overalls, face masks and hair nets and see how engineering and science skills are put into practice.

Richard Thomas, Headteacher of Pevensey and Westham School said, “We were delighted to run this event again this year. The response from the schools that attended was excellent and it is clear that these kinds of events have a lasting impact on the profile of STEM in local schools.” Aoife Cherrill, acting as a reporter for Ocklynge Junior School, was “impressed with the quality of presentations and the range of ideas presented by the schools. It was great fun and really interesting.”

For more info on the charity Practical Action’s free STEM resources for schools go to www.practicalaction.org/schools

ResearchEd Durrington: Takeaways

What a fantastic day at ResearchEd Durrington. My takeaways.

“No pressure but I wanted to feel re-engaged with education and inspired to bring the benefits of research into the schools I work with. I will take away a new perspective on how important it is to understand the research behind so many aspects of teaching and learning. Sessions with Sarah DonarskiClare Sealy and Tom Sherrington were particularly interesting with lots of ideas to develop teaching, learning and assessment with a better understanding of cognitive overload.”

I am a bit of a veteran of TeachMeets but this was my first ResearchEd Conference. What a great day! Given an unenviable choice of 25 different sessions, I went with the soft option that would confirm some of my existing practice and knowledge, rather than those I thought might challenge my current thinking. Next time, I would choose the same ones again but would somehow clone myself or become a fly on the wall and visit all the others too.

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Takeaways:

Keynote: Daniel Mujis  A refreshing perspective from a well-respected Ofsted guru looking at how we can learn from each other, share ideas and make the most effective use of research. He eloquently described how we must be always seeking evidence to support our professional roles.

Session 1: Tom Sherrington  Totally confirming all my thoughts about reports, assessment and data. Total ‘guff’ as Tom put it so succinctly. He added a simple analysis of the bell-shaped ‘curse: 30% of kids this summer are going to get a grade 1, 2 or 3 in Maths no matter how hard they try. 50% of kids are going to be worse than average. So what should we do instead? 1. Redraft and Re-do (third time for excellence). 2. Rehearse and repeat (improve confidence). 3. Revisit and respond (practice makes perfect. 4. Knowledge testing, quizzes to check understanding. 5. Research and find out. Record your findings. Such a great opening session. Good book plug at the end too.

Session 2: Dr Caroline Creaby I am always looking for ways to support teachers preparing classes for revision so this session was ideal. Upshot: a really simple but effective way to train learners in a reflective process using a wheel format. It works. Simple.

Session 3: Clare Sealy If you do one thing after reading this, try learning how to tell the time on a Fibonacci Clock. You will need to know the rules and you will need a non-colour blind friend too. All designed to show how difficult it is to process instructions as an adult but even more importantly how we teach young children to tell the time on an analogue clock. All about cognitive overload and how our short-term memory just can’t cope with too much information. Clare was easy to listen to and clearly passionate about her thinking. Fantastic session.

Session 4: Sarah Donarski. A terrific end to the day. Sarah was clear and concise, erudite and eloquent and bristled with teaching ideas. A thorough debrief on research on questioning; how to do it, when to do it and why. There was a great selection of teaching ideas, ways to stretch and challenge and key concepts to link research to practice. Brilliant.

There’s a link to many of the presentations and twitter accounts here. If you get a chance to attend or even participate in a ResearchEd event, then I thoroughly recommend it. With thanks to Durrington High, Organiser Shaun Allison and all the staff, presenters and teachers attending the event.