Southern Rocks 2019 #srocks19

It was all set to go. Pastries, chairs, coffees, rooms, projectors, lights, cameras. But no ‘action’. The snow couldn’t be beaten. Basingstoke was under a white mountain of snow and organisers Kristian Still and David Rogers took the difficult decision to postpone the event to secure the safety of over 250 visitors and presenters. A tough choice given the sheer amount of planning that had taken place.

I had offered to present a session to support science teaching in primary schools. I created a series of short practical science ideas to help remove misconceptions, stimulate scientific questioning and give teachers some simple, cost-effective and practical ideas to use in their classrooms on Monday.

Given that we didn’t get to try these out, I made some short videos once I was back home to demonstrate these ideas. See below. Feel free to add questions or comments.

On Friday evening, speakers and sponsors were invited to attend the Devil’s Punchbowl Hotel for dinner and drinks – a chance to get together, to connect and meet like-minded educators. With heavy snow coming in at pace, colleagues struggled to make it with any ease. Some got stuck and turned back, some ploughed on and some found nearby watering holes and stuck in for the night. Tales of great journeys, akin to the voyage of the protagonist through the snow in The Day After Tomorrow, filled the room as more people arrived with even better stories and more snow on their boots.

It was a great chance to connect with the real people of Twitter (the event was predominantly developed through the educators of Twitter) and hear their stories. But most of all it reminded me that although teaching can sometimes be a lonely profession (a class full of kids that aren’t always interested in how you are feeling), it is heartwarming to know that there are other, interested and interesting connections to be made, to reassure you that there is much right with the world of education and it is filled with many charismatic, generous and genuine people. I very much look forward to connecting with all of these people and more at the rescheduled #srocks19

I also got a chance to see (very briefly), the stunning view of The Devil’s Punchbowl in the snow. Stunning.

time lapse M&Ms in water
Alka Seltzer tablets in water in a 35mm film canister – stand well back
very fine steel wool with a 9V battery

Brilliant Bogotà

Dropping into any big city for a few days means it can be difficult to gauge what real life might be like if you were actually living there. Bogotà, Colombia comes with a plethora of health warnings for personal safety and most people think of drug cartels, violence and political chaos when you mention either Bogotà or Colombia. I read the FCO advice before I travel anywhere for work or holiday. It means I have covered the ‘disclaimer’ issue should anything ever happen. However, I always work on seeing things first hand, meeting people who actually live and work there – taking things on face value. It works for me.

This trip was working with teachers at the prestigious Colegio Anglo Colombiano, a forward-thinking, hard-working school with dedicated staff, high-quality leadership and wonderful facilities for children from nursery to late teens. I was privileged to be representing Dragonfly Training again and able to deliver a range of courses to different groups of teachers over three days.

Day One was working with 25 middle leaders from the senior school. We explored the idea of the importance of a ‘vision’, to bring people on board, inspire them and provide a focus. Staff also considered how to observe, collect data and evaluate its importance, carefully planning the next steps in line with their vision. We also looked at managing change and planning for the future.

Day Two was with 120 teachers from across the senior school. We looked at a whole range of ideas for differentiation and how to challenge all students to reach their potential. One of the interesting aspects of this was that a large proportion of teaching staff was Spanish speaking and so, with a professional translation outfit, primed in their little booth and me, miked up, it was great to see how they translated some of the ‘teacher-speak’. They did very well apparently!

The third day was more bespoke to the needs of the College. We worked with a group of Teaching and Learning Champions; those that showed ambition, talent and potential (and were also willing to come in on a Saturday!). It was based around a ‘Stretch and Challenge’ theme and included a number of resources from Practical Action. Using STEM as a driver of progress has been a passion of mine for a very long time. Teachers and students are inspired and engaged. It is easy to bring an immediate and real-world context to each of the tasks. And it’s fun. We looked at the ‘Why’ for each of these teachers and considered how the world was going to change over the next few years for our students. Really thought-provoking discussions.

It was an immensely rewarding trip. Working with teachers and leaders who want to ensure that young people who are potential champions and sergeants of the future country are equipped with skills of compassion, empathy, purpose and determination to do better, was humbling, heartwarming and inspiring. I look forward to returning.

Also got a chance to sample some incredible Colombian coffee in a Coffee Laboratory. Just brilliant.