Bottle of nuts to go!

Training in Lagos. What an incredible experience with memories to treasure.

A quick look at TripAdvisor or the FCO website and Lagos, Nigeria would probably not be top of anyone’s list. However, with a bit of research, some reassurance from fellow trainers at Dragonfly Training and a visit to Boots pharmacy, I packed my bags and set off for St Saviours School Ikoyi in Lagos.

As part of a structured professional development programme and a continuing relationship between the school and Dragonfly Training, I was invited to deliver a three-day programme for all staff entitled ’21st Century Teaching and Learning’. Day one was with a group of teaching assistants, full of enthusiasm, looking at effective deployment in classrooms. We examined a range of evidence of best practice and explored the essence of good working relationships. Day two and three were for teaching staff but many of the teaching assistants joined in (even on their days off). We worked on a range of practical activities that allowed staff to access a range of strategies to support differentiation, better feedback, stretch and challenge and assessment. There was also plenty of time for reflection, discussion and a bit of dancing.

The school is an oversubscribed independent prep school for just over 300 children from Reception to Year 6. Staff are mainly Nigerian, with UK teacher qualifications and a selection of experienced ex-pat staff mainly from the UK but also from France and the Czech Republic. The school is overseen by a highly committed and passionate board of trustees who make regular visits to support the school. The Headteacher is Craig Heaton, a charismatic, well-travelled, sharp-dressed leader with a knack for getting the best out of his staff. He quickly builds trust with all stakeholders and his staff enjoy working with him. His vision for the school, a place of the highest quality learning and teaching is rapidly becoming a reality. He is ably assisted by Deputy Head, Chinwe Ibekwe, who is a testament to the development opportunities available to all staff. She started at St Saviours over 20 years ago as a teaching assistant and has seen much progress. She is committed to providing a rich, challenging and professionally stimulating place to work and her enthusiasm is infectious.

I was fortunate enough to travel to Lagos via Amsterdam with Craig and his family for the last leg of the trip. On arrival, we were met by our security team and escorted through Yellow Fever checks, immigration and customs. Craig’s advice on being asked for ‘tips’ by customs and baggage checks is simple. His response is always ‘With four daughters do you think I have anything spare?!’ He tips where he needs to for his security staff and we swiftly move through to our car where an armed guard is ready to follow us into town. This is not an alarmist response just a sensible precaution and very much part of the way of life for many with significant roles in the city. We chat on the way in and arrive at the hotel about an hour later. Further security briefings included advice on leaving the hotel, chatting to ‘single ladies’ in the bar and contact numbers of half a dozen staff in case of emergency. I felt I had been fully briefed!

We spent two evenings out visiting the local Lagos Yacht Club for dinner, watching the tankers and newly built oil rigs saunter up and down the lagoon, trying peppered snails, and a high-class Thai-fusion restaurant overlooking a beach and nearby islands, with a stunning menu and an interior to match. Lunch at school was a decent helping of Jolof rice, spicy and tasty, with a chunk of chicken on the side.

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I was very aware of the significant contrast between rich and poor in Lagos. There is no hiding from the exceptional poverty and hardship that many people face. However, the industry, the willingness to work hard and the endeavour that people show every day is incredible. People travel from miles away to work in the city and then spend hours travelling back to their families in cramped, overcrowded, battered, yellow VW sardine cans. They hold their heads high, literally, with straight backs and find any way they can to make a living. For some, this means a suit and a briefcase, for others, it’s a large round tray of bottles of peanuts, or grapes or soft drinks or photocopied bestsellers or chewing gum often carried on their head in the middle of three or four dusty lanes of hooting, tooting, passive-aggressive car and lorry drivers. Note: road markings seem to be largely an optional extra and are often regarded as perfunctory. Quality of road surface is pretty variable too as the heat rapidly degrades the tarmac leaving cave size potholes.

I would encourage any teacher looking for an adventure in a developing country, working with passionate, committed professionals to consider St Saviours school in Ikoyi, Lagos. If I was many years younger and looking for a challenge, for memories to last forever and a professionally rewarding job, this school would be the place. The course was a great success with some great takeaways for staff (see below). If you would like the course ’21st Century Teaching and Learning’ in your school then get in touch with Mary Chapman, International Director of Dragonfly Training mary@dragonfly-training.co.uk  or call +44 (0)2920 711787.

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I’ll leave the last word to Craig Heaton, Headteacher at St Saviours School.

“I hope that our values, our teaching and our school will mean that one day a child will return to Nigeria as an inspirational leader and change the country for the good of all Nigerians.”

 

East meets West in Shanghai

This was one of the highlights of training this year, alongside my second visit to Ethiopia in August. Hugely anticipated and requiring significant planning, this was always going to be an exciting trip. I was invited to work with Nord Anglia International School in Shanghai, Pudong on behalf of Dragonfly Training Ltd. It’s a long way to go for a day’s training so I managed to persuade myself that I needed a couple of days in Hong Kong on the way back to ease the jet lag.

Arriving a day before training, I had a chance to wander the old quarter of Shanghai and adjust to the new time zone. It’s a busy place with regular updates on smog and air quality available to its millions of people, many of whom were wearing face masks. The air quality that day wasn’t particularly bad so I passed on the face mask. I stood on The Bund and watched the enormous, heavily laden and almost sinking barges make their way along the river, puffing out diesel fumes and chugging away like old men with cigars hanging from their mouths.

The school was a fantastic, purpose-built venue, set in plenty of acres in the middle of Pudong. With a wide range of international students to cater for, from ages 3 to 18 and from all over the world, the school had exceptional facilities to offer them. The staff provided a warm welcome, with a great deal of enthusiasm for the training that day and great feedback at the end. I will always adjust course content to suit a particular context and I will always respond to feedback from delegates on how the day has been received.

I had a chance to look around the school, talk ‘teacher talk’ for a while and then prepare myself for a short (2 hour) flight to Hong Kong. Having never been to ‘Honkers’ before, I wasn’t quite sure what to expect but I had done some background research which proved helpful. I hadn’t really pictured what such a huge number of people in such a small place would really look like. Shopping on the equivalent of Black Friday was not a wise choice. Pretty crazy shoppers – thousands of them – queuing up for bargains and rifling their way through piles of clothes, labels flying everywhere. On the Sunday, having walked miles on the Saturday, exploring the sights, I came across another peculiar human phenomenon: ‘Philippino Maid Sunday’ – they all have the same day off – they all meet in subways, underpasses, bridges, pavements, just about anywhere really and sit and chat. They dance, cook, socialise and buy and sell clothes and jewellery. It is a sea of humans and negotiating your way through is quite a task.

I have certainly learnt a great deal from travelling, exploring and asking questions about life on the other side of the planet. As I continue to work with teachers around the world, I can draw on these experiences, create unique contexts for the training sessions and empathise with different cultures. Fascinating.

The course I was delivering is called The Big Four – Sustainably Improving the Quality of Teaching and Learning. Available through Dragonfly Training Ltd.

Differentiation and Beyond

Dragonfly Training offer practical courses designed for teachers across the world.

Teaching teachers. A piece of cake they said.

I spent a day with teachers from St. George’s English International School in Munich last week. A wide range of nationalities, skills, teaching backgrounds and experience and a whole host of previous training days under their belts. For the teachers, the new term promised a brand new school building, slightly out of the centre of Munich, but with so much to do and only so many hours in a day, the shiny windows, squeaky clean flooring and whistle-white walls would have to wait. It wasn’t ready. We were relocated to a local football club with a decent-sized function room.

Training teachers takes effort, patience, understanding and an unusual perspective. It took me a while to get over the fact that I wasn’t teaching and I wasn’t offering egg-sucking courses either. The fact that I had 22 years teaching experience didn’t really matter. What counted was my ideas, my take on teaching, knowing what works and finding the right way to connect with colleagues on many different levels. I consider myself to be emotionally intelligent. It is important to know what a bad training day looks and feels like. There have been a few. Listening to regurgitations of the ‘Haynes manual of teaching’ and wishing you were still on that beach. Painful. But a good training day can be inspirational, uplifting and fire you up for days, weeks and even years. I am fortunate enough to have attended lots of these. I have also worked with energizing colleagues and gained a great deal from them.

The teachers at St. George’s were definitely ready for a good day. Some were still figuring out where to live in their new town but all were ready to engage. After some warm up activities, we looked at three key pillars of good teaching and learning: Differentiation, Assessment for Learning and Feedback. Teachers tried some practical ways to differentiate for learners. We called it ‘personalization’. There are so many ways that learners can be challenged, stretched and engaged appropriately.

Here are some of our differentiation ideas:

  • Multi part tasks – split part one into three different tasks with different levels of complexity eg describe A) Romeo and Juliet main characters, B) family circumstances and C) the effect of family on their relationship. Then use all of these together to D) write a short summary of the main events of Romeo and Juliet and then E) write a 140 character tweet to summarize the story including spaces, hashtags, and emojis.
  • Providing roles – scribe, observer, listener, artist, designer, summarizer, timer etc. Kids love roles and respond differently to each job description. Rotate at will.
  • Scaffolding – provide support and structure in different guises. Simple skills developing into more complex skills. You can also use mind tools to help with creative thinking.
  • Framing questions – ‘from the viewpoint of ……., how did …….impact on …….’ creates opportunities for empathy and can also provide constraints within which a question can be answered.
  • Big questions – contextualizes the learning. This is important for all learners but especially EAL learners.
  • Real Issues – gets young people fired up about big issues and means they can see how learning becomes relevant to their world
  • Projects – learners can approach projects in so many different ways. Let them have an open-ended outcome and see what happens
  • Differentiation by learning needs – this could be dyslexia, EAL (English as an Additional Language), cognitive (processing), sight, hearing, behaviour, autism, Free School Meals, Gifted and Talented. Think about how you would need to differentiate for each of these.
  • By sequence – change the order of activities to suit the needs of different learners
  • By pace – change the timing of each activity to suit individuals but keep the pace up.
  • Use circus or stations – you can change the order, have certain stations for each group of learners or provide increasing complexity as you move around – this works well in science with different experiments for example.
  • By outcome – provide different levels of outcome (possibly colour them, grade them or give them different names such as ‘beginner’, ‘expert’, ‘ninja’)
  • By task – provide choices for learners eg hot, spicy, mild – better than easy, medium and difficult
  • By activity – watch something, listen to an audio file, talk to each other, write something, act out something – lots of ways to engage learners on different levels.
  • The ‘enable table’ – set up a table, space or wall display with extra, extension information.

There are many others (feel free to add yours in comments) but with a limited amount of time, we then considered how to assess pupils progress using a range of classroom techniques and strategies.

  • Asking questions (the right type of question) – these are the tools of your trade – get them right and you will find true wisdom and enlightenment!
  • Red, Orange, Green student response cards, to hold up, leave on the desk so that teachers can see who understands what.
  • Mini whiteboards – these have seen significant use in classrooms across the world. Great for checking on progress. Join them up in a line or make a ‘big picture’ with all of them on the floor or hold them up for a time lapse video.
  • Standing on a continuum – these are useful and get learners out of their seats – try ‘yes/no’, ‘agree/disagree’, ‘1-10’ or make up your own
  • Find your corner – label each corner A, B, C and D – pupils stand in each corner depending on the question
  • Hot responses – hot, spicy, mild – pupils choose an activity and difficulty, therefore, indicating their confidence
  • How many fingers – 1-10 confidence level or 1-5 depending on the question
  • Thumbs Up or Down – quick testing of confidence
  • Confidence Rating – use 1-4 rather than 1-5 as pupils will often plump for the middle one.
  • Sad face or smiley face – easy to use in books, whiteboards etc for self or peer assessment
  • Starting Point – by deciding on level of entry pupils indicate their confidence level and prior knowledge
  • No hands – means all pupils have to come up with a good answer and to help with this…
  • Random Name Generator – use http://www.classtools.net (with loads of other games and tools) or StickPick app (small cost).
  • Snowball fight – write/work on something – scrunch it up and all throw at the same time – good fun – open, add, edit, assess, scrunch and throw. Repeat. Use notes with annotations to formulate a final draft.
  • Snowballing – one person works on a task, pairs up, joins a third, a fourth and so on.
  • Pyramid – one pairs with another, two become four, become eight etc – good for class discussion

Feedback has most effect when it creates ‘cognitive conflict’ meaning that the student is puzzled they got it wrong, and starts to work out why, Hattie (2003)

We also had a play with Quizlet Live, Kahoot, Spiral, Socrative, Plickers and QR codes. Lots of digital ways to assess learning and find ways to move forwards. We also looked at how to support EAL learners in the classroom – often a significant factor in International Schools.

You can see some of the feedback on the course below. Teachers left with practical strategies that really work. Dragonfly Training pride themselves on making courses ‘hands-on’, based on current research and educational thinking and bespoke to a particular context for each school. Each course can be adapted to suit any number of teachers. They also work well for all-through schools. Get in touch if you would like more information. With huge thanks to those staff willing to share some feedback on camera. (You were great!)

This was a great team of teachers to work with. Full of enthusiasm and ready to take on new ideas and tweak some old ones. Have a look at their site here http://www.stgeorgesschool.de/munich

 

 

I also deliver courses on Google Suite – Apps for Education (Digital Pedagogy), Raising Boys’ Achievement, Active Learning, Science and STEM in Junior and Elementary Schools and Wellbeing. Just get in touch with Dragonfly HQ for more information.

Return to Ethiopia – finding your ‘ikigai’

Whilst not quite the eye-opening experience of last summer, my return to Bingham Academy in Addis Ababa, was none the less inspirational and uplifting. I was delighted to be asked back to work with an amazing group of teachers, many of whom were present last year. Retention of staff in International Schools is always an issue especially when they don’t get paid. That’s right. No pay. Teachers raise money through friends, family and their church groups in order to fund a year at Bingham Academy in Addis Ababa. The funds cover food, some of the travel costs and general living. Many teachers bring their families. Lock, stock and barrel. They often commit themselves to at least two years with many staying longer or returning at a later date.

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This is where staff are: right in the middle.

There is an undeniable feeling of warmth and welcome in the campus. It’s not the weather – it was rainy season again and just about scraped into the twenties (seventies Fahrenheit) – but the people who work there. From the drivers, security staff, cleaners and cooks to the teaching assistants and teachers, everyone plays their part and very much contributes to the unique atmosphere at Bingham Academy. Their Faith is key. They come here to help spread the word of God. It’s not overt and ‘for the sake of it’ but it is interwoven in everything they do. They are fully committed to what they do. A husband of one of the teachers works in a recording studio, translating the bible stories into many of the 80 different local languages in order to improve literacy rates. Fascinating and inspiring.

Dragonfly Training delivers an extensive range of courses for teachers. This is my third year and they have sent me to all sorts of places to deliver training. It’s a real privilege to be part of a team committed to improving standards in education and supporting teachers with practical strategies to engage and inspire young people. Bingham Academy identified some key issues that were hindering their rate of progress. Children come from diverse backgrounds, cultures and educational systems. They often dip in and out and their starting points can vary widely. Add to this the fact that ‘results’ count and teachers are under pressure to make every lesson count. Dragonfly Training approached this with some teaching and learning fundamentals: Assessment for Learning strategies and good old fashioned differentiation. Teachers explored how to assess learning in a number of practical ways. Great responses and engagement from teachers meant each of the ideas generated even more suggestions for success within this unique context. A series of differentiation ideas and some Project Based Learning followed in the last two sessions with positive outcomes for all staff.

I will apply ‘digital’ strategies to learning wherever possible but the internet in Ethiopia often hangs quite literally by a thread. I offered some use of Spiral (www.spiral.ac) which with strong internet will be a potent tool for learning and assessment. We also had a play with Kahoot and Quizlet. The Ethiopian Government often disconnects the Internet (it’s a big red switch) at the first sign of political unrest or for days on end when there is exam season. Last year, exam papers were released online (unofficially) from which widespread cheating ensued. This year, WiFi went offline for 3 weeks in June which negated the (online) cheating somewhat. The school has to cope with regular outages and it just becomes part of life. I found it rather refreshing.

I had three evenings on campus; A chance to socialise and get to know a little more about what makes Bingham Academy such a great place to be. The first night was pizza night with board games. I haven’t really played board games for decades (apart from a family game of Scrabble which I ended up winning because I was the only player left!) and it was great not to be reliant on devices electrical or otherwise for entertainment. It was social networking in its truest form. New staff joined in and I became one of the family for the evening. I loved it. The second night was dinner in a family home with friends, stories, good food and the usual warmth of welcome. Thirdly, was dinner out with twenty teachers and a bit of local grub. Njeera is the must-have and requires a good palate, a taste for spices and plenty of antibacterial hand gel. A sense of adventure helps too.

I am looking forward to another return to Addis Ababa. The people are fascinating, charming and passionate about what they do. There is a great deal of commitment to improving things in every classroom from Kindergarten right through to Year 12. I have set them some ‘Project Based Learning’ ideas – sown a few seeds – and I hope that these have created enough of a spark in each teacher to take them through the year. I am keen to develop science teaching in the elementary and junior school and thinking of ideas that fit with their unique context. You can find out more about their work here http://binghamacademy.net/ 

With best wishes for the next year and thanks to all the staff at the school.

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Spiral to success

Teaching and learning are all about engagement. If you can find the right way to ‘hook’ learners then the ‘reeling in’ is much easier. In my role as a teacher and trainer, I have used a wide variety of tools to switch people on; tone of voice, body language, volume, music, video, quizzes, pupil leaders, active tasks, readers, visual stimuli (‘fascinators’ my art teacher friend calls them) and more recently digital tools.

I am running a new course for Dragonfly Training called ‘Current Best Practice in Digital Pedagogy’ as I believe there is a real lack of clarity about what really works in the post-big-digital-spend wave that has passed through so many schools. Ultimately schools are looking for tools that improve outcomes for learners, don’t require huge training and engage pupils and staff alike. It doesn’t matter if the next tool is all singing and all dancing because if teachers have to spend hours getting to grips with the mechanics and preloading data it just won’t work.

I’m using three highly efficient and simple to use tools for my teaching, training and business use. Spiral.ac, Google Apps for Education and Kahoot. I have written about Kahoot and Google Apps already, so here’s some info about Spiral.

Spiral.ac  is a suite of four apps that provide engagement, collaboration and live feedback. They are simple to use, efficient and reliable and really work. The first one is

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The first one is Quickfire. A quiz app that allows preloaded questions or shoot from the hip kind of teaching where pupils answer through devices and the teacher can tick, send back, comment or present to the class. Answers can be anonymised and names revealed at a later date. Responses can be collated by individual or by class and archived for use at parents evenings or review sessions to reflect on progress. You can also search for other public quizzes and edit those to save time. A new feature within Quickfire called ‘Step’ means you can pull out particular questions and responses for expansion.

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Next up is Discuss. Import a slide show from PowerPoint or Google Slides and the app creates images of each slide which can then be populated with questions or just responses from learners from open-ended questions. This is really useful for Assessment for Learning at key points in the lesson (start, middle and end). Again, all feedback can be archived and shared with learners in a review session. You can also create slides in a variety of formats from scratch which provides flexibility in presentation styles.

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The third in the suite is Team Up. This is a great tool for differentiation in lessons. Divide up students into random or pre-arranged groups, allocate roles, objectives and outcomes and they work collaboratively to create presentations through instantly linked devices and present them as a team. Evidence is collected and it’s easy to see who has contributed (or not!). It provides for creativity, collaboration and teamwork – essential employability skills.

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Last but definitely not least is Clip. This is a game changer and means you can take any YouTube clip and add questions at key points to check understanding and learning. The progress indicators are obvious. Play the video without questions, then repeat with questions, open up for discussion with open-ended questions and then check responses. The Chrome Webstore (apps for the Chrome browser) provides a Spiral add-on that makes adding questions to video clips seamless. There’s also the ability to set viewing for home time and independent study, where pupils can watch as many times as they like – flipped learning at it’s best.

As a trainer, these apps work really well. Presentations become highly engaging, interactive and fun. There’s minimal setup time because I can import directly from Google Slides, YouTube and PowerPoint or just have open-ended discussions in workshops. Being able to demonstrate the features of Spiral whilst delivering a training session is great and all the apps are applicable to a classroom, training room or board room equally well.

The best news is Spiral is free. There are some premium ‘dashboard’ style features available to account managers that provide a detailed analysis of usage and progress reports but the basic suite of apps is free and is likely to remain so. So what do you need to get started? Sign up for a teacher account at www.spiral.ac, check out their Twitter account for news, tips and tricks and updates.

For more information on the Dragonfly Course ‘Current Best Practice in Digital Pedagogy’ get in touch with them here http://www.dragonfly-training.co.uk/

 

 

 

Training in Ethiopia

August 2016 Bingham Academy, Addis Ababa

A long flight from London Gatwick to Addis Ababa via Dubai brought me to Bingham Academy, a mission school in the heart of the bustling city. It was rainy season. Proper rain. Can’t see the roads kind of rain. For three months of the year, the quality of road surface gradually deteriorates and large holes are commonplace. The journey to the school was bumpy, slightly concerning but nevertheless eye-opening and entertaining.

The school is set within a busy market district of the city within a walled compound. A guarded gate provides entry. The buildings were a mixture of concrete and corrugated iron roofing with polished wooden floors and spaces in the walls for a select group of rodents, and newer buildings with offices and well-lit classrooms. The vultures flying overhead were interested in the local abattoir located just round the corner. The heavy humidity meant a variety of new smells were hanging in the air.

Brad Adams, Director of Bingham Academy showed me around. I had a little apartment within the main school building. Brad described how the teachers were sponsored by their local churches to teach children of missionaries working in the country. Most would raise tens of thousands of pounds to fulfil their calling to work in this fascinating country. Many teachers came with their families, with a long term commitment. Some were young Christians, wanting to start a lifelong career of service.   I got settled and then went to my first hosts for dinner. We chatted over spaghetti about faith and service, teaching and commitment and the Olympics.

Monday was the first of two training days for over fifty staff. We looked at differentiation and assessment for learning. Techniques for personalising learning and getting the best out of individuals. A great deal of engagement from participants helped along with some chocolate and some Haribo love. Dinner was hosted by an English couple, one a GP responsible for looking after the teachers, the other staff and the missionaries. Bizarrely, he was also my late cousin’s GP back in St.Albans in another life. Small world. Shepherd’s Pie, apple crumble and a bottle of local beer to wet the whistle was welcomed heartily. We talked about drones and how small the world was.

Tuesday was a day for Active Learning. We danced, sang and played. Lots of ideas for engaging learners. Maximum participation and excellent feedback on the day. We had a debate, we had trust games, team building skills, science experiments and lots of discussion about effective teaching. A good day.

My last evening was hosted by Shane and Naomi. An Australian couple. Both teachers, who had brought their four children with them for the long game. Strong in faith and full of hope and optimism yet painfully realistic about the challenges facing the people of the local area. Naomi had provided outreach to groups and families, supporting them to overcome poverty, prostitution, and lack of hope. A chance to refit a steel roof for a family of eight brought tears of joy to everyone and fortified links with the local community.

We sampled local food that evening washed down with local beer and the best coffee I have ever had. We were joined by three of Shane’s children who all delved into the ‘njeera’. They loved their days at school and were passionate about wanting to stay there and finish with good qualifications. We chatted that night about life, kids, fishing and the lemons that come our way occasionally. Lovely lovely people.

My route home was via an ancient monument on Entoto and a flying visit to see Lucy (Australopithecus afarensis to her friends) which was a real treat. I was fascinated by the culture, the people, the history, and how they make their living. It is undoubtedly tough out there but people seem genuinely happy even when it’s raining. The flight home was filled with Ethiopian girls looking for work in the bright lights of Dubai. Housemaids, cleaners, domestics perhaps. Very few of them had been on a plane before. They struggled to familiarise themselves with airline toilets, food and drink choices and general etiquette on a plane but who could blame them.

On reflection, I would love to work with Bingham Academy again, if only to be in a place where character, commitment and faith are valued above all else. It was a collection of motivated teachers wanting to give their very best. I was inspired.

The building and surrounding walls have taken a battering in the last week as a result of torrential downpours. The school is funded by charity donations. If you have read this far and would like to help they can be found on Facebook (here) and a link to a fundraising page is here https://rceinternational.webconnex.com/43000

Training was provided by Dragonfly Training Ltd who bring hands-on practical courses to schools across the planet.