Running: a British School in Nanjing

I have always been an advocate of running. Good for the soul and good for the heart. Not so good for the knees. It clears my mind and gives me breathing space away from 4G, Wifi, browsers and emails. It’s always been a key to a better work-life balance.

As part of my work with Dragonfly Training, I was invited to run two training days at The British School in Nanjing. My two year visa and an excellent track record, meant I was a good fit. We had lots of time to find out exactly what the school’s needs were, so we formulated a toolbox of practical ideas to improve, regenerate and revitalise teaching and learning. After a long journey, my first priority was to explore the school, share resources and connect with senior staff. I was able to spend time listening to the Head of Senior School, Heidi Witt-Williams and the Headteacher, Matthew Shephard, describe the unique context of their school. It was time well spent.

I just want to say how much of a pleasure it was to host Marcus here in Nanjing. I think it’s often overlooked how important it is that training is enjoyable and that trainers need to be engaging. Marcus was excellent; I only got to sit in a couple of hours of the two days but I felt inspired. – Matthew Shephard, Head, BSN

The two days were filled with practical suggestions for differentiation, assessment for learning, stretch and challenge and ways to create independent learners. The final session looked at how to use projects (particularly STEM projects from www.practicalaction.org/schools) to bring classrooms alive. Staff completed the Squashed Tomato Challenge, starting with a scavenger hunt for various items and then constructing a working model to show how to bring small amounts of tomatoes down a Nepalese hillside to markets in the valleys. Great fun, highly engaging and a fantastic way to finish the two days.

Day one started with a ‘Keynote’ presentation to the whole staff. It was called ‘Brilliant Brains’ and was really a way to get people thinking about how connections, brain development and memories are key factors in learning. I have learnt a great deal from a fellow trainer at Dragonfly, Dave Taylor and been lucky enough to share ideas about how kids learn best and what makes us better teachers. I was able to use some of these during the first session.

Making connections with real teachers really matters to me. I invest a huge amount of time and effort in creating a tailored course to suit the needs of individual schools. I want people to enjoy it, but most of all I want it to impact on their professional lives, making work more rewarding, fulfilling and ultimately more enjoyable. I want children to be engaged and nurtured, stretched and challenged rather than become passengers in a classroom full of uninspiring content and knowledge. I was inspired by the passion of the educators at the British School in Nanjing, their flexibility and willingness to adapt to new situations, new buildings and new challenges. I have a follow up chat with the Head in the next few days to see how things are progressing.

The Head, Matthew Shephard, has a calm and uncomplicated approach to school leadership. He promotes quality first teaching, supporting and encouraging his staff. He is surrounded by a highly experienced team of educators who promote and model excellent teaching and learning from Nursery up to Year 13. We discussed leadership styles, teaching and learning……. and running. I suggested a simple program to build up to 10k over the next few months. Good for the soul. Good for the heart. I look forward to joining him on a run in Nanjing the next time I visit.

For details on Dragonfly Training courses, give Mary Chapman a call on +44 (0)2920 711787 or email mary@dragonfly-training.co.uk

 

East meets West in Shanghai

This was one of the highlights of training this year, alongside my second visit to Ethiopia in August. Hugely anticipated and requiring significant planning, this was always going to be an exciting trip. I was invited to work with Nord Anglia International School in Shanghai, Pudong on behalf of Dragonfly Training Ltd. It’s a long way to go for a day’s training so I managed to persuade myself that I needed a couple of days in Hong Kong on the way back to ease the jet lag.

Arriving a day before training, I had a chance to wander the old quarter of Shanghai and adjust to the new time zone. It’s a busy place with regular updates on smog and air quality available to its millions of people, many of whom were wearing face masks. The air quality that day wasn’t particularly bad so I passed on the face mask. I stood on The Bund and watched the enormous, heavily laden and almost sinking barges make their way along the river, puffing out diesel fumes and chugging away like old men with cigars hanging from their mouths.

The school was a fantastic, purpose-built venue, set in plenty of acres in the middle of Pudong. With a wide range of international students to cater for, from ages 3 to 18 and from all over the world, the school had exceptional facilities to offer them. The staff provided a warm welcome, with a great deal of enthusiasm for the training that day and great feedback at the end. I will always adjust course content to suit a particular context and I will always respond to feedback from delegates on how the day has been received.

I had a chance to look around the school, talk ‘teacher talk’ for a while and then prepare myself for a short (2 hour) flight to Hong Kong. Having never been to ‘Honkers’ before, I wasn’t quite sure what to expect but I had done some background research which proved helpful. I hadn’t really pictured what such a huge number of people in such a small place would really look like. Shopping on the equivalent of Black Friday was not a wise choice. Pretty crazy shoppers – thousands of them – queuing up for bargains and rifling their way through piles of clothes, labels flying everywhere. On the Sunday, having walked miles on the Saturday, exploring the sights, I came across another peculiar human phenomenon: ‘Philippino Maid Sunday’ – they all have the same day off – they all meet in subways, underpasses, bridges, pavements, just about anywhere really and sit and chat. They dance, cook, socialise and buy and sell clothes and jewellery. It is a sea of humans and negotiating your way through is quite a task.

I have certainly learnt a great deal from travelling, exploring and asking questions about life on the other side of the planet. As I continue to work with teachers around the world, I can draw on these experiences, create unique contexts for the training sessions and empathise with different cultures. Fascinating.

The course I was delivering is called The Big Four – Sustainably Improving the Quality of Teaching and Learning. Available through Dragonfly Training Ltd.

Music4Learning #6

“You wake up tomorrow and there’s no music. It’s all gone. Not even a note. “

How crazy and unimaginable would that be. Our brains respond so powerfully to music that there has to be a strong connection. The Sync Project is trying to gather individuals to verify the effects of music with tangible, hardcore research and evidence. There are many experts out there willing to throw their hand in to help pull a few strings. By invitation only, a group gathered to thrash out and explore some ideas at McGill University last month – the link is here. Take a look at what they are trying to achieve….

At I Can Teach, we believe that certain types of music are real Brain Food – the connection with the soul is undoubted but to help the brain’s engine room really kick into gear, there are beats that work. Using music at 50-80 beats per minute, often classical music, can generate an increase in alpha waves in the brain. This dramatically improves brain function and can increase memory capacity and retention. Pachelbel’s Cannon in D major is an ideal piece of music and Mozart’s Sonata for Two Pianos in D major is also highly influential. Beethoven’s Pastoral Symphony is a delight to improve creative writing.

“Several of my Year 4 and Year 3 teachers are now regularly using I Can Teach music in their classrooms. There has been a significant impact on pupil concentration when listening to the brain food music while writing”. Rob Evans – Headteacher

The music is calming, reassuring and purposeful. The atmosphere is noticeably different and I know my students value the opportunity to pause, reflect and improve even if they wouldn’t confess to being a fan of classical music.