Southern Rocks 2019 #srocks19

It was all set to go. Pastries, chairs, coffees, rooms, projectors, lights, cameras. But no ‘action’. The snow couldn’t be beaten. Basingstoke was under a white mountain of snow and organisers Kristian Still and David Rogers took the difficult decision to postpone the event to secure the safety of over 250 visitors and presenters. A tough choice given the sheer amount of planning that had taken place.

I had offered to present a session to support science teaching in primary schools. I created a series of short practical science ideas to help remove misconceptions, stimulate scientific questioning and give teachers some simple, cost-effective and practical ideas to use in their classrooms on Monday.

Given that we didn’t get to try these out, I made some short videos once I was back home to demonstrate these ideas. See below. Feel free to add questions or comments.

On Friday evening, speakers and sponsors were invited to attend the Devil’s Punchbowl Hotel for dinner and drinks – a chance to get together, to connect and meet like-minded educators. With heavy snow coming in at pace, colleagues struggled to make it with any ease. Some got stuck and turned back, some ploughed on and some found nearby watering holes and stuck in for the night. Tales of great journeys, akin to the voyage of the protagonist through the snow in The Day After Tomorrow, filled the room as more people arrived with even better stories and more snow on their boots.

It was a great chance to connect with the real people of Twitter (the event was predominantly developed through the educators of Twitter) and hear their stories. But most of all it reminded me that although teaching can sometimes be a lonely profession (a class full of kids that aren’t always interested in how you are feeling), it is heartwarming to know that there are other, interested and interesting connections to be made, to reassure you that there is much right with the world of education and it is filled with many charismatic, generous and genuine people. I very much look forward to connecting with all of these people and more at the rescheduled #srocks19

I also got a chance to see (very briefly), the stunning view of The Devil’s Punchbowl in the snow. Stunning.

time lapse M&Ms in water
Alka Seltzer tablets in water in a 35mm film canister – stand well back
very fine steel wool with a 9V battery

Want a better world?

Nearly 50 pupils from across Eastbourne and Seaford gathered to discuss and debate ideas on global issues such as clean water, renewable energy and sustainable technologies. They presented their ideas to the conference of pupils and teachers and then shared their ideas with other pupils in true science conference style. Eastbourne College again hosted the second STEM Leaders’ Conference on Thursday 26 April at the prestigious Birley Centre in Eastbourne and it was a great success for all involved.

The schools attending included Seaford Head School, Willingdon Primary School, St John’s Meads CE Primary School, Parkmead CE Primary School, Pevensey and Westham CE Primary School and The Haven VA CE Primary School. Pupils had been working on a variety of projects over the last few weeks inspired by a wide range of resources created by the global STEM charity Practical Action. These projects included The Squashed Tomato Challenge (where pupils find a way to transport tomatoes down a Nepalese mountainside to take them to market without squashing them), The Floating Garden Challenge (where pupils design, build and test different forms of floating garden so that people in Bangladesh can still grow crops even in flood waters) and Ditch The Dirt (where pupils create a water filtration system to clean dirty water).

Conference Organiser, Marcus Cherrill of I Can Teach Ltd, who created the conference on behalf of Pevensey and Westham School said, “The STEM Leaders’ Conference is all about sharing ideas and allowing pupils from local schools to work on engaging and stimulating projects. They can then develop their leadership, teamwork and presentation skills through the Conference. It is a very supportive and non-competitive environment which allows pupils to really develop their confidence. We also had support from a number of local and national companies who provided prizes for the pupils, their teachers and their schools.”

St John’s Meads CE Primary School won a VIP Tour of local pharmaceutical company TEVA, where they dress up in overalls, face masks and hair nets and see how engineering and science skills are put into practice.

Richard Thomas, Headteacher of Pevensey and Westham School said, “We were delighted to run this event again this year. The response from the schools that attended was excellent and it is clear that these kinds of events have a lasting impact on the profile of STEM in local schools.” Aoife Cherrill, acting as a reporter for Ocklynge Junior School, was “impressed with the quality of presentations and the range of ideas presented by the schools. It was great fun and really interesting.”

For more info on the charity Practical Action’s free STEM resources for schools go to www.practicalaction.org/schools