Bottle of nuts to go!

Training in Lagos. What an incredible experience with memories to treasure.

A quick look at TripAdvisor or the FCO website and Lagos, Nigeria would probably not be top of anyone’s list. However, with a bit of research, some reassurance from fellow trainers at Dragonfly Training and a visit to Boots pharmacy, I packed my bags and set off for St Saviours School Ikoyi in Lagos.

As part of a structured professional development programme and a continuing relationship between the school and Dragonfly Training, I was invited to deliver a three-day programme for all staff entitled ’21st Century Teaching and Learning’. Day one was with a group of teaching assistants, full of enthusiasm, looking at effective deployment in classrooms. We examined a range of evidence of best practice and explored the essence of good working relationships. Day two and three were for teaching staff but many of the teaching assistants joined in (even on their days off). We worked on a range of practical activities that allowed staff to access a range of strategies to support differentiation, better feedback, stretch and challenge and assessment. There was also plenty of time for reflection, discussion and a bit of dancing.

The school is an oversubscribed independent prep school for just over 300 children from Reception to Year 6. Staff are mainly Nigerian, with UK teacher qualifications and a selection of experienced ex-pat staff mainly from the UK but also from France and the Czech Republic. The school is overseen by a highly committed and passionate board of trustees who make regular visits to support the school. The Headteacher is Craig Heaton, a charismatic, well-travelled, sharp-dressed leader with a knack for getting the best out of his staff. He quickly builds trust with all stakeholders and his staff enjoy working with him. His vision for the school, a place of the highest quality learning and teaching is rapidly becoming a reality. He is ably assisted by Deputy Head, Chinwe Ibekwe, who is a testament to the development opportunities available to all staff. She started at St Saviours over 20 years ago as a teaching assistant and has seen much progress. She is committed to providing a rich, challenging and professionally stimulating place to work and her enthusiasm is infectious.

I was fortunate enough to travel to Lagos via Amsterdam with Craig and his family for the last leg of the trip. On arrival, we were met by our security team and escorted through Yellow Fever checks, immigration and customs. Craig’s advice on being asked for ‘tips’ by customs and baggage checks is simple. His response is always ‘With four daughters do you think I have anything spare?!’ He tips where he needs to for his security staff and we swiftly move through to our car where an armed guard is ready to follow us into town. This is not an alarmist response just a sensible precaution and very much part of the way of life for many with significant roles in the city. We chat on the way in and arrive at the hotel about an hour later. Further security briefings included advice on leaving the hotel, chatting to ‘single ladies’ in the bar and contact numbers of half a dozen staff in case of emergency. I felt I had been fully briefed!

We spent two evenings out visiting the local Lagos Yacht Club for dinner, watching the tankers and newly built oil rigs saunter up and down the lagoon, trying peppered snails, and a high-class Thai-fusion restaurant overlooking a beach and nearby islands, with a stunning menu and an interior to match. Lunch at school was a decent helping of Jolof rice, spicy and tasty, with a chunk of chicken on the side.

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I was very aware of the significant contrast between rich and poor in Lagos. There is no hiding from the exceptional poverty and hardship that many people face. However, the industry, the willingness to work hard and the endeavour that people show every day is incredible. People travel from miles away to work in the city and then spend hours travelling back to their families in cramped, overcrowded, battered, yellow VW sardine cans. They hold their heads high, literally, with straight backs and find any way they can to make a living. For some, this means a suit and a briefcase, for others, it’s a large round tray of bottles of peanuts, or grapes or soft drinks or photocopied bestsellers or chewing gum often carried on their head in the middle of three or four dusty lanes of hooting, tooting, passive-aggressive car and lorry drivers. Note: road markings seem to be largely an optional extra and are often regarded as perfunctory. Quality of road surface is pretty variable too as the heat rapidly degrades the tarmac leaving cave size potholes.

I would encourage any teacher looking for an adventure in a developing country, working with passionate, committed professionals to consider St Saviours school in Ikoyi, Lagos. If I was many years younger and looking for a challenge, for memories to last forever and a professionally rewarding job, this school would be the place. The course was a great success with some great takeaways for staff (see below). If you would like the course ’21st Century Teaching and Learning’ in your school then get in touch with Mary Chapman, International Director of Dragonfly Training mary@dragonfly-training.co.uk  or call +44 (0)2920 711787.

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I’ll leave the last word to Craig Heaton, Headteacher at St Saviours School.

“I hope that our values, our teaching and our school will mean that one day a child will return to Nigeria as an inspirational leader and change the country for the good of all Nigerians.”

 

Do Teaching Assistants make a difference?

Beware: According to the analysis of collected research by the Education Endowment Foundation, using Teaching Assistants either in or out of the classroom can actually have a detrimental effect on pupil progress and you are going to have to pay pots of money for it. However, if used effectively for targeted intervention with recognised programmes, in a sustainable and timely manner, then pupil progress can be enhanced by an additional 3 to 6 months.

Over 380,000 Teaching Assistants are employed across the UK costing schools a whopping £5 billion per year. Training TAs to work effectively, plan properly and coordinate their efforts with teachers so that children learn in parallel with other students, can make a massive difference to overall outcomes for children, staff, schools and parents.

Ten reasons to improve the use of TAs provides some more and less obvious ideas for developing the skills of all staff.

A summary of recommendations also highlights best practice identified by current and ongoing research. Take a look here

Dragonfly Training run a range of courses for Teaching Assistants and for schools on Making Effective Use of Teaching Assistants and Improving Relationships in the Classroom. At Prince’s Mead School, a highly successful and sought-after prep school in Hampshire, Dragonfly Training were asked to deliver a course to bring together teachers and TAs and to demonstrate the value that TAs can bring to learning in and out of a classroom. Marcus Cherrill, a trainer for Dragonfly, worked with Penn Kirk, Headmistress, to create a particular range of activities to develop and enhance relationships in the classrooms of Prince’s Mead. To make the day more cost-effective, the cost of the course was shared with a local school, Twyford Prep School, one of the oldest in the UK. Penn Kirk was “delighted with the outcomes of the day. Our Teaching Assistants felt valued and part of the team. It was important to recognise how different strengths in different ‘teams’ meant effective working practices could still be achieved. Dragonfly has helped facilitate this today.” She added, “Marcus was a fabulous trainer, able to provide pace, challenge and humour into the day, with the flexibility to build a number of ideas into the day. The feedback from staff has been very positive.”

 

If you would like this course at your school and want to find out more about our wide range of courses for improving teaching and learning then call us on +44 (0)2920 711787 or email Wendy or Mary at info@dragonfly-training.co.uk